LMU’S COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE AWARDS 17 SCHOLARSHIPS

Lincoln Memorial University-College of Veterinary Medicine (LMU-CVM) held its first scholarship and awards ceremony on Monday, May 2, 2016. A total of $42,200 in scholarships were awarded to 17 veterinary medicine students.

 

Pictured left to right: Courtney Haviland, Stephanie Betbeze, Jessica Trubey, Kendra Harper, Rachel Boswell, Space, Matthew Heydenburg, Lindsey Kudlack, Carl Smola, Paul Riedel, Casey Skowron, Kelly Murphy, Hyo Pan, and Ana Weiland.

 

“We are proud to recognize these veterinary students for their academic excellence, proficiency in research, community service and leadership,” LMU-CVM Dean Dr. Glen Hoffsis said. “We hope that through these scholarships our students will be encouraged to continue striving to be leaders in the field of veterinary medicine.”

 

In meeting its mission to serve the health and wellness needs of people, animals and the environment in Appalachia and beyond, LMU-CVM handed out several awards to students from the Appalachian region. The Jim Whitt Annual CVM Scholarship was awarded to Cody Gibson of Dryden, Virginia, a first year veterinary medicine student, who is also a Virginia resident. The Drs. Jason W. Johnson and Jennifer T. Johnson Rural Appalachian Region Veterinary Scholarship was awarded to Paul Riedel of Waterford, Virginia, a first year student veterinary medicine student who is an Appalachian resident, and has the intention of returning to serve the Appalachian region upon graduation. The LMU-CVM Snider Whitaker Endowed Appalachian Scholarships were awarded to two first year veterinary students that are residents of the Appalachian region including Samuel Allie of Elizabethton, Tennessee and Kendra Harper of Isonville, Kentucky.

 

A total of 13 scholarships were given to both first and second year veterinary medicine students based on several factors including academics and proficiency, research, community service and leadership. These scholarships were awarded as follows:

 

  • The LMU-CVM Snider Whitaker Endowed Research Scholarship was awarded to Ana Weiland of Darlington, South Carolina, a first year student based on academics and proficiency in research.

 

  • The Glen Hoffsis Annual CVM Scholarship was awarded to Matthew Heydenburg of Grand Haven, Michigan, a first-year veterinary medicine student.

 

  • The Dr. Robert W. Henry Veterinary Anatomy Scholarship was awarded to two first year anatomy students including Courtney Haviland of Annapolis, Maryland and Whitney Loftis of Nashville, Tennessee.

 

  • The LMU-CVM Snider Whitaker Endowed Equine Scholarship was awarded to Jessica Trubey of Berrien Springs, Michigan, a first-year student based on academics and proficiency in Equine Medicine.

 

  • The LMU-CVM Snider Whitaker Endowed Food Animal Scholarship was awarded to Stephanie Betbeze of Birmingham, Alabama, a first-year student based on academics and proficiency in Food Animal Medicine.

 

  • The LMU-CVM Snider Whitaker Endowed Companion Animal Scholarship was awarded to Rachel Boswell of Longview, Texas, a first year student based on academics and proficiency in Companion Animal Medicine.

 

  • The Dr. Edwin Robertson Memorial CVM Scholarship was awarded to four LMU-CVM second year students based on academics, community service, and leadership. The students awarded were Kelly Murphy of Croton, New York, Lindsey Kudlack of Wellington, Florida, Hyo-Seon Pan of Charlottesville, Virginia and Casey Skowron of Salem, Ohio.

 

  • The LMU-CVM General Scholarship was awarded to two LMU-CVM second year students based on academics and leadership, from CVM faculty. The students awarded this scholarship were Christopher Smola of Auburn, Alabama and Kristin Sadler of Cullowhee, North Carolina.

 

Hoffsis added, “Supporting our students is a top priority. We are very grateful for every donor that gave generously to make these scholarships available. This is only the beginning. We hope to make even more scholarships available to veterinary students in the future.”

 

The Lincoln Memorial University-College of Veterinary Medicine is located on the LMU main campus in Harrogate, Tennessee, with additional academic facilities in nearby Lee County, Virginia. LMU-CVM is an integral part of the University’s medical programs and provides real-world, community-based education in a collaborative learning environment. For more information about LMU-CVM, call 1-800-325-0900, ext. 7150 or visit us online at vetmed.LMUnet.edu.

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DR. JASON JOHNSON APPOINTED DEAN OF LMU-COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE

JOHNSON APPOINTED DEAN OF LMU-COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE

Harrogate, Tennessee, May 20, 2016 – Lincoln Memorial University (LMU) President B. James Dawson has named Dr. Jason Johnson as vice president and dean of the LMU-College of Veterinary Medicine (LMU-CVM).

 

“Dr. Jason Johnson has been an integral part of the foundation of the LMU-College of Veterinary Medicine, so it is fitting that the torch is passing to him,” Dawson said. “Wise and experienced well beyond his years, Jason has been recognized throughout the veterinary profession as a rising star with a firm handle on what the future of veterinary medicine education could look like. I am confident that under his leadership, the CVM will continue to thrive and LMU-trained veterinarians will improve animal and human health in Appalachia and beyond.”

 

Johnson will step into the role currently held by Dr. Glen Hoffsis, LMU-CVM’s founding dean. Hoffsis will continue working to ensure a smooth transition of leadership. He has also been tasked with working on fundraising and assisting with special projects. Hoffsis shaped LMU-CVM from its infancy, creating numerous innovative approaches to veterinary education, including a formal affiliation agreement with the University of Kentucky. Hoffsis instituted a hybrid distributive model of clinical education, developed a state of the art clinical skills campus including an innovative spay and neuter program and assembled a talented faculty and staff. Provisionally accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education (AVMA COE), LMU has two enrolled classes of veterinary students and will welcome a third in August.

 

“LMU was very fortunate that Dr. Glen Hoffsis brought his vision for changing veterinary education to Harrogate, Tennessee and Ewing, Virginia,” Dawson said. “As the nation’s only three time veterinary dean having served over 21 years, three and half of them here at LMU, he had a mountain of experience to draw on. Under his dynamic leadership LMU achieved many things that so many cautioned would never happen. Glen would probably argue with me and say that a college is never truly established, but this college is now on a solid foundation. It has provisional accreditation by the AVMA, a strong enrollment and facilities that rival virtually any other college of veterinary medicine. All of those things would not be possible without the contributions of Dr. Hoffsis.”

 

A founding faculty member, Johnson was promoted to associate dean of clinical sciences in October 2015. He also has served as an associate professor of theriogenology as well as the medical director of the DeBusk Veterinary Teaching Center (DVTC). While at LMU-CVM, Johnson developed a clinical skills course that is incorporated into every semester of the curriculum and is evaluated in high stakes, competency-based objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs). He led the development, design, capital campaign, technology implementation and construction of over 100,000 square feet of facilities at the DVTC, as well as developed a grant acquisition plan procuring approximately six million dollars in construction and equipment grant funding for LMU-CVM. He has been responsible for all clinical faculty, technical and managerial staff, teaching equipment and animals. Johnson also serves as the executive director of the Center for Animal Health in Appalachia (CAHA), which he founded. CAHA has a mission in economic research, animal and public health research, education, advocacy and promotion of veterinary practices in underserved areas.

 

Prior to joining the faculty at LMU, Johnson worked in private practice and served on the faculty of Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine. In 2012, he was one of 10 veterinarians nationwide to be selected for the AVMA’s Future Leaders Program and was named to Veterinary Practice News’ “25 Vets to Watch in our 25th Year.” He serves in numerous leadership capacities within organized veterinary medicine including the AVMA House of Delegates, Legislative Advisory Committee, AVMA Food Safety Advisory Committee and is a board member of the Theriogenology Foundation.

 

A native of Luverne, Alabama, Johnson is a 2003 graduate of the Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine and a diplomate in the American College of Theriogenologists (the branch of veterinary medicine concerned with reproduction). Johnson completed a three-year residency at Auburn University in food animal theriogenology, earning a master’s degree. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Troy State University. Johnson and his wife, Dr. Jennifer T. Johnson, reside in Tazewell, Tennessee, with their son Elijah.

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LMU TO LAUNCH PET-FRIENDLY RESIDENCE HALL PILOT PROGRAM

Harrogate, Tennessee, May 4, 2016— Lincoln Memorial University (LMU) will launch a pilot program allowing pets in two of its residence halls in July 2016.

“This is a tremendous privilege that we are excited to provide for graduate and professional students,” said Dr. Jonathan Leo, vice president for student and enrollment services. “LMU is joining a very small fraternity of institutions in higher education that recognize the benefits of animal companionship.”

The program will span two academic years and will allow graduate and professional students who reside in Mars Hall and Lee Hall to keep one pet per student. The pets are limited to dogs under 80 pounds, cats and small pets including rabbits, fish, small birds, ferrets, chinchillas, rats, hedgehogs, hamsters, sugar gliders, gerbils, guinea pigs, iguanas and bearded dragons.

Mars Hall and Lee Hall are located five minutes from LMU’s main campus in the town of Cumberland Gap, Tennessee, adjacent to the University Inn Apartments. Each suite can house up to three students with a limit of three pets per suite. Mars and Lee are dedicated graduate and professional student housing. First priority for the pilot program will be reserved for students enrolled in the LMU-College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM).

Residents participating in the program will pay a registration fee of $150, which covers a veterinarian assessment during the registration process, a LMU pet ID tag and flea treatment for the buildings. Additionally, LMU will be providing a fenced-in area for pets to play off their leashes. Pets are expected to be on a leash in any other outdoor area on campus or around the residence halls.

During the pilot study, the University will review a number of factors including wear and tear on facilities, student and community feedback as well as the well-being of participants. At the conclusion of the study, the program could be expanded to other areas on campus or be made available to other populations.

LMU will become the first University in the state of Tennessee with Pet-Friendly housing. While some colleges and universities across the country allow fish and other small animals in their residence halls, very few have housing dedicated to students with animals.

Lincoln Memorial University is a values-based learning community dedicated to providing educational experiences in the liberal arts and professional studies.  The main campus is located in Harrogate, Tennessee. For more information about the undergraduate and graduate programs available at LMU, contact the Office of Admissions at 423-869-6280 or e-mail at admissions@lmunet.edu.

Caption: Lincoln Memorial University student Jessica Stegner and her furry friend Frodo are ready for a study break. Stenger, a biomedical professions master’s student, lives in the residence halls which will be part of LMU’s pilot pet friendly dorm policy.

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DR. LONNIE KING TO CHAIR CAHA ADVISORY BOARD

DR. LONNIE KING TO CHAIR CAHA ADVISORY BOARD

Harrogate, Tennessee April 22, 2016–The Center for Animal Health in Appalachia (CAHA) is pleased to announce that Dr. Lonnie King, former dean of The Ohio State University–College of Veterinary Medicine, has been appointed chair of the CAHA Advisory Board.

Dr. Jason Johnson, CAHA executive director said, “Dr. Lonnie King’s vast experience in the field of veterinary medicine, animal agriculture and his expert knowledge in the One Health arena makes him the ideal leader to guide our team as we work to improve animal and public health issues in Appalachia and beyond. It is my belief that Dr. King’s experience and dynamic leadership will guide CAHA to envision the future of veterinary medicine and furthermore, spur us to develop education, research, outreach, advocacy, and new markets that ensure a bright future for veterinary medicine.”

Lincoln Memorial University-College of Veterinary Medicine (LMU-CVM) formed CAHA at the DeBusk Veterinary Teaching Center in Lee County, Virginia. LMU-CVM and CAHA also conduct research and administrative activities on the LMU main campus in Harrogate, Tennessee. Created as a research, data-driven, practice-friendly and policy-oriented center, CAHA’s focus is on the unique challenges facing animal and public health in the 13-state Appalachian region.

Previously King served as dean for 10 years at Michigan State University following 19 years with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service as both Deputy Administrator for Veterinary Services and Administrator for the agency. While serving as the nation’s Chief Veterinary Officer, he worked extensively in global trade agreements and has testified before Congress on issues of emerging diseases and animal health.  A member of the National Academies of Science, King is also boarded by the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine. Most recently he directed the National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne and Enteric Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control, and currently serves as vice chair of the Obama Administration’s recently established Presidential Advisory Council on Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria. King received his bachelor’s degree and doctor of veterinary medicine degree from The Ohio State University, a master’s degree in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota, and a master’s degree in public administration from American University. An expert in “One Health” and the emergence of new diseases, he is a highly sought-after speaker regarding the convergence of human and animal health and the future of veterinary medicine. King was recognized as Ohio’s Veterinarian of the Year for 2015, and was recently appointed the director of OSU’s new Office of Innovation and Collaboration.

The mission of CAHA is to improve animal health and public health in the Appalachian region and beyond through five initiatives including:

  1. Conferences, workshops and training programs to raise awareness and advance knowledge of animal and public health issues;
  1. Development of an innovative Rural Practice curriculum, which will be offered to veterinary students from LMU-CVM and other schools;
  1. Community educational programs for Appalachian residents, farmers, veterinarians and others using the LMU-CVM facilities and online;
  1. Public education and advocacy on animal health and public health issues affecting the Appalachian region;
  1. Research and research-funding support related to Appalachian animal health and public health, including annual publication of the State of Animal Health in Appalachia Report.

 

For more information about the CAHA Conference visit http://vetmed.lmunet.edu/caha or email CAHA@LMUnet.edu.

 

Lincoln Memorial University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is located on the LMU main campus in Harrogate, Tennessee, with additional academic facilities in nearby Lee County, Virginia. LMU-CVM is an integral part of the University’s medical programs and provides real-world, community-based education in a collaborative learning environment. For more information about LMU-CVM, call 1-800-325-0900, ext. 7150 or visit us online at vetmed.LMUnet.edu.

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LMU-CVM Partners with Knox-Whitley Humane Association to Help Pets Find Homes

LMU-CVM PARTNERS WITH KNOX-WHITLEY HUMANE ASSOCIATION TO HELP PETS FIND HOMES

 

Harrogate, Tennessee, March 2, 2016 – Lincoln Memorial University-College of Veterinary Medicine (LMU-CVM) is partnering with Knox-Whitley Humane Association in Corbin, Kentucky, by providing food and care items as well as clinical services.

 

In accordance with its mission to serve underserved populations, LMU-CVM developed the Shelter Outreach in the Appalachia Region (SOAR) program to provide clinical services including medical care and spay or neuter services to animals in its state of the art facility located in Ewing, Virginia. The Knox-Whitley Humane Association is one of several local shelters to benefit from the program.

 

The student chapter of the Veterinary Business Management Association at LMU-CVM initiated a collection of needed items for the shelter. In December, over 150 pounds of dog and cat food and numerous toys and blankets were collected to provide a more comfortable stay for an animal in the shelter.

 

“Partnering with organizations like the Knox-Whitley Humane Association is a win-win. Our students gain real-world experience while saving hundreds of lives of pets in our communities and helping reduce the overpopulation of animals in the region,” said LMU-CVM Dean Glen Hoffsis, D.V.M., M.S., D.A.C.V.I.M.

 

Knox-Whitley Humane Association is a non-profit organization that serves Knox, Whitley, McCreary, and Clay counties in Kentucky. The mission of the shelter is to place abandoned and relinquished animals into loving homes.  For more information about the Knox-Whitley Humane Association visit www.kwas.org.

 

The Lincoln Memorial University-College of Veterinary Medicine is located on the LMU main campus in Harrogate, Tennessee, with additional academic facilities in nearby Lee County, Virginia. LMU-CVM is an integral part of the University’s medical programs and provides real-world, community-based education in a collaborative learning environment. For more information about LMU-CVM, call 1-800-325-0900, ext. 7150 or visit us online at vetmed.LMUnet.edu.

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JOHNSON APPOINTED ASSOCIATE DEAN OF CLINICAL SCIENCES AT LMU-CVM

Harrogate, Tennessee, February 4, 2016 – Lincoln Memorial University-College of Veterinary Medicine (LMU-CVM) is proud to announce that Dr. Jason Johnson, associate professor of theriogenology and medical director of the DeBusk Veterinary Teaching Center for Lincoln Memorial University-College of Veterinary Medicine has been selected as the associate dean of clinical sciences for LMU-CVM. Johnson is also the executive director of the Center for Animal Health in Appalachia (CAHA).

“Jason has an energy and enthusiasm for the field of veterinary medicine like no other,” said LMU-CVM Dean Glen Hoffsis, DVM, MS, DACVIM. “He is an outstanding administrator and his tireless work with the Center for Animal Health in Appalachia has helped establish LMU-CVM as a thought leader in veterinary medicine research and education.”

Johnson’s new position includes being the medical director of the DeBusk Veterinary Teaching Center with responsibilities for the operations of over 100,000 square-feet of facilities. He is also responsible for all clinical faculty, technical and managerial staff, teaching equipment and animals. Johnson will continue to serve in his role as executive director of CAHA, which has a mission in economic research, animal and public health research, and promotion of veterinary practices in underserved areas.

“We have an incredible team of leaders in the veterinary program at Lincoln Memorial University, and I am honored to be a part of it,” said Johnson. “Our inaugural class will soon begin clinical rotations, and as our program continues to grow, I look forward to working with the faculty and staff to help prepare our students for their careers in veterinary medicine, and to help advocate for animal health in Appalachia.”

 

In 2012, Johnson was one of 10 veterinarians nationwide to be selected for the American Veterinary Medical Association’s (AVMA) Future Leaders Program and was named to Veterinary Practice News’s “25 Vets to Watch in our 25th Year.” Johnson is a 2003 graduate of the Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine and a diplomate in the American College of Theriogenologists. Johnson completed a three-year residency at Auburn University in food animal theriogenology, earning a master’s degree. Johnson is a native of Luverne, Alabama.

Lincoln Memorial University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is located on the LMU main campus in Harrogate, Tenn., with additional academic facilities in nearby Lee County, Virginia. LMU-CVM is an integral part of the University’s Division of Health Sciences and provides real-world, community-based education in a collaborative learning environment. For more information about LMU-CVM, call 1-800-325-0900, ext. 7150 or visit us online at vetmed.LMUnet.edu.

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LMU-CVM HOLDS ANNUAL RESEARCH DAY

Lincoln Memorial University-College of Veterinary Medicine (LMU-CVM) held its first Research Day at the Hamilton Math and Science Building on November 13, 2015. Over 200 students, faculty and staff attended the event as well as faculty from the University of Kentucky.

Kicking off the event, Dr. David Horohov, chair of the Department of Veterinary Science and director of the Gluck Equine Research Center at the University of Kentucky (UK) and professor of immunology at LMU-CVM spoke about available research opportunities to veterinary students. Dr. Craig Carter, director of the University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (UKVDL), a full service animal health diagnostic facility, also shared information about research projects and the UKVDL facility. A keynote presentation on Equine Sperm Lipidomics was made by Dr. Paul Wood, professor of pharmacology at LMU-CVM. The day concluded with poster presentations from twelve students on their summer research projects.

“We are most appreciative of the strong support of Dr. Horohov and Dr. Carter and their faculty who participated in the student research and in the presentations. Research day highlighted the integration of research that has resulted from the cooperative agreement between University of Kentucky and LMU,” said Dr. Glen F. Hoffsis, dean of LMU-CVM.

The students who presented posters included Jordan Bradley, Lorrin Cheeney, Sarah Elzinga, Lindsey Kudlack, Taylor McConnell, Kelly Murphy, Mariah Pearson, Meredith Rice, Bradley Rohleder, Casey Skowron, Lydia Titus, Kayla Wielgus and Jason Wilton.

An awards presentation, sponsored by Fisher Scientific, included two $100 gift cards for the top two poster presentations. The winners were Rohleder for his presentation titled, “Effects of the common sweetener stevioside on glucose and insulin dynamics, and inflammation in horses with equine metabolic syndrome vs. controls” and Wielgus for her presentation titled, “Prevalence and mean intensity of Baylisascaris procyonis in raccoons (Procyon lotor) in Warren County, Kentucky.”

Lincoln Memorial University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is located on the LMU main campus in Harrogate, Tennessee, with additional academic facilities in nearby Lee County, Virginia. LMU-CVM is an integral part of the University’s medical programs and provides real-world, community-based education in a collaborative learning environment. For more information about LMU-CVM, call 800.325.0900, ext. 7150, or visit us online at vetmed.LMUnet.edu.

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DR. VROEGINDEWEY OF LMU-CVM PRESENTS AT GLOBAL ONE HEALTH SUMMIT

Gary Vroegindewey, D.V.M., M.S.S., D.A.C.V.P.M., director of the One Health Program at Lincoln Memorial University-College of Veterinary Medicine (LMU-CVM) chaired the “Education and Capacity Building within One Health and Integrative Risk Management” session at 3rd Global Risk Forum (GRF)-One Health Summit in Davos, Switzerland, on Oct. 6, 2015.

Dr. Vroegindewey with Dr. Walter Ammann, president and CEO of the Global Risk Forum.

Dr. Vroegindewey with Dr. Walter Ammann, president and CEO of the Global Risk Forum.

 

At the conference, Vroegindewey also gave presentations on “Beyond Three Rings-An Enhanced Model of One Health,” “One Health and Resilience- A Biological Modeling Framework” and “World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) Role in Resilience and Disaster Management” representing LMU and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). The GRF One Health Summit is an annual conference that promotes and fosters an integrative approach in managing health risks at the interface of human, animal and environmental health with a strong link to food safety and security and to agriculture.

“The One Health framework is the concept that there is a nexus and inextricable link between human health, animal health and environmental health,” Vroegindewey said. “Veterinarians and animal experts play a critical role in multiple aspects of public health.”

In addition to serving as director of the LMU-CVM One Health Program, Vroegindewey is an adjunct assistant professor of public health/biometrics for the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences and an adjunct assistant professor at Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. He previously served as the director of global health initiatives for the Center for Public and Corporate Veterinary Medicine at Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine. Vroegindewey earned his bachelor’s degree in zoology at the University of Missouri, and a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine. He is also a diplomat of the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine.

Vroegindewey is very active within the international arena as chair of the OIE (World Animal Health Organization) ad hoc group on disaster management and risk reduction in relation to animal health and welfare and veterinary public health. He has also served as chair for the International Affairs Committee of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC), AAVMC representative to the American Veterinary Medical Association Committee on International Veterinary Affairs, chair of the veterinary section of the World Association on Disaster and Emergency Medicine, advisory board member of the Michigan State University Master in Food Safety program, food safety consultant to Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the White House Security Council Food and Agriculture Working Group. Vroegindewey has also served in multiple senior positions in the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps.

His awards and recognitions include the AVMA XII International Congress Prize in 2010, University Veterinary College Alumnus of the Year, Army Legion of Merit, Meritorious Service Medal, Order of Military Medical Merit, Surgeon General’s “A” Designator and numerous others.

“Dr. Vroegindewey is a leader both nationally and internationally in public health and animal health,” said Dr. Glen F. Hoffsis, dean of LMU-CVM. “We are fortunate to have him on faculty to help us train future veterinarians and improve animal health in the Appalachia region.”

Lincoln Memorial University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is located on the LMU main campus in Harrogate, Tennessee, with additional academic facilities in nearby Lee County, Virginia. LMU-CVM is an integral part of the University’s medical programs and provides real-world, community-based education in a collaborative learning environment. For more information about LMU-CVM, call 800.325.0900, ext. 7150, or visit us online at vetmed.LMUnet.edu.

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LMU-CVM RELEASES 2015 STATE OF ANIMAL HEALTH IN APPALACHIA

The Center for Animal Health in Appalachia (CAHA) held its first national conference at Lincoln Memorial University-College of Veterinary Medicine (LMU-CVM) DeBusk Veterinary Teaching Center in Lee County, Virginia, October 14- 15. The event marked the release of the 2015 State of Animal Health in Appalachia report.

CAHA executives set out to determine the distribution of veterinarians throughout the footprint of the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC), the animal composition and distribution of trends and the impact that veterinarians have on rural communities. CAHA partnered with the National Center for Rural Health Works and the national Center for the Analysis of Healthcare Data and created a Mixed Animal Practice Model to show which projects impacts at the county level. Through existing literature and capacity modeling, the Center estimated the county level need for Large and Mixed Animal Veterinarians within Appalachia.

Through its research CAHA and its partners found a total of 7,178 in-state practicing veterinarians within the Appalachian footprint provide care for an estimated 13.8 million small animals and 13.7 million large animals within an estimated herd size worth $42 billion. These 7,178 veterinarians provide a total employment impact of estimated 8 people per practice, and their practices serve as economic engines for their communities by providing an estimated $2.3 billion to the economy within the footprint of Appalachia. The report also shows that veterinary practices provide 57,424 jobs within Appalachia.

Based upon the modeling it first appeared that Appalachia is well served with veterinarians. However, a staggering statistic that was found through within the research was that 75 percent of the rural counties within the footprint have an apparent veterinary shortage estimated to be 1,907 veterinarians. This shortage translates into an estimated economic loss of $621 million and 15,256 jobs.

“Veterinarians are indeed important to the economy of Appalachia and rural America,” concluded Dr. Jason Johnson, executive director of CAHA and medical director of the DeBusk Veterinary Teaching Center at LMU-CVM. “What we have discovered through this research is that much of Appalachia is underserved by veterinarians, and there is a significant loss of economy due to the lack of veterinarians in the rural counties of Appalachia.”

The event included wide-ranging presentations and discussions on cutting edge issues within the veterinary and public health industries including economic drivers, animal health, public/one health and legislation and policy.

Ann Peton, director of the National Center of the Analysis of Healthcare Data & Rural Health Policy assisted with the research for the report, and also participated on Public/One Health panel at the conference. “We brought together some of the highest level of individuals within the profession of veterinary medicine to talk about how we find solutions at a very critical time when there is an increasing demand for protein in our diets, but also a huge need to create an integrated system between veterinarians, physicians and others within the public health sector, working together to start finding solutions that will meet the needs of the public,” said Peton.

“It is very interesting that this occurred here in the middle of Appalachia where there is a significant need, but also a significant presence amongst the people who have grown Lincoln Memorial University, because of all of the integrated programs they have already created,” said Peton. “We are finding solutions here that will reach out beyond the Appalachian region.”

Dr. Lonnie King, former dean of The Ohio State University–College of Veterinary Medicine, served as the keynote speaker and gave a presentation on One Health and Social Relevance. He presented global issues as it relates to disease, poverty, hunger, and the connection between animal health and public health. An expert in “One Health” and the emergence of new diseases, he is a highly sought-after speaker regarding the convergence of human and animal health and the future of veterinary medicine. King was recognized as Ohio’s Veterinarian of the Year for 2015, and was recently appointed the director of OSU’s new Office of Innovation and Collaboration.

“One health can change the scope, scale and potential impact or relevance of the veterinary profession,” said Dr. King during his presentation.

Panelists at the 2015 CAHA conference included:

  • Dr. Theresa Bernardo, IDEXX chair of Emerging Technologies and Bond-Centered Animal Healthcare for the Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph
  • Dr. Jim Brett, associate clinical professor, Large Animal Ambulatory Service, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University
  • Dr. Craig Carter, director of the University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory
  • Dr. Michael Dicks, director of veterinary economics, American Veterinary Medical Association
  • Dr. Gerald Doekson, director, National Center for Rural Health Works
  • Dr. Michael Gilsdorf, executive vice president, National Association of Federal Veterinarians
  • Dr. David Fugate
  • Gina Luke, assistant director, Governmental Relations Division, American Veterinary Medical Association
  • Dr. Andy Maccabe, executive director, Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges
  • Ann Peton, director, National Center of the Analysis of Healthcare Data & Rural Health Policy, Education and Research at Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Dr. Gary Sherman, national program leader, Veterinary Science and national program leader, Animal Agrosecurity for USDA National Institute of Food & Agriculture (NIFA)

CAHA’s goal is to inform and pull together innovative ideas to help the veterinary profession, human healthcare, government and higher education better meet the acute needs of the people and animals of Appalachia. Organizations participating in the event include leadership from U.S. Department of Agriculture, state governments, state veterinary medical associations, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Veterinary Medical Association, Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges, state veterinarians, food safety, college leadership, allied organizations, industry and farm bureau.

Lincoln Memorial University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is located on the LMU main campus in Harrogate, Tenn., with additional academic facilities in nearby Lee County, Va. LMU-CVM is an integral part of the University’s Division of Health Sciences and provides real-world, community-based education in a collaborative learning environment. For more information about LMU-CVM, call 1-800-325-0900, ext. 7150 or visit us online at vetmed.LMUnet.edu.

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LMU-CVM ANATOMY PROFESSORS ARE HELPING PRESERVE THE WORLD’S BIGGEST HEART

blue-whale-heart-02When Dr. Paul Nader and Dr. Bob Henry were contacted to work on preserving the world’s largest heart from a 76.5-foot blue whale, they knew this would be no ordinary whale tale. The Lincoln Memorial University-College of Veterinary Medicine (LMU-CVM) anatomy professors are working with international partners from Canada’s Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) including Interim Director and CEO, Dr. Mark Engstrom and Jacqueline Miller along with Dr. Gunther von Hagens of Gubener Plastinate GmbH in Germany to preserve the blue whale’s heart using a process called plastination. The process involves preserving biological tissue by replacing water or fat with a polymer like silicone to produce a preserved specimen for anatomical study.

This international relationship between the partners began in 2014 while Nader, an emergency veterinarian with a background in wildlife and zoo medicine, was working in Florida. He heard about nine blue whales that died in Newfoundland, Canada, and felt compelled to help. Dr. Mark Engstrom of the Royal Ontario Museum reached out to Nader because of his background, and his previous experience working with whales. Nader was asked to help remove the pelvic remnants and heart of one of the blue whales.

Thrilled for the opportunity, Nader convinced his boss to give him a week off work and he flew from Florida to Newfoundland at his own expense to work with this international group of volunteers to retrieve the organs of the blue whale.

Nader was able to help locate the heart and found it intact, but was unable to stay for the final day in which they made the incision and removed the heart. But he kept his pulse on the project along the way.

When the idea of using the plastination process to preserve the whale heart came up, Nader knew immediately who to turn to – Dr. Bob Henry, an anatomy professor at Lincoln Memorial University, and a specialist in plastination.

“Dr. Henry and Dr. von Hagens (inventor of the plastination process) are the leading experts on animal plastination in the world,” said Nader. “I explicitly wanted to come teach at LMU to work with Dr. Henry because he is a specialist in plastination.”

In the fall of 2014, Nader got that chance when Dr. Henry gave him a call to let him know LMU-CVM was in need of an anatomy instructor. Nader jumped on the opportunity to work side by side with Henry and further their work together on the preservation of the whale heart. Henry believes that the anatomy of the blue whale heart is similar to but many times larger than that of sperm whales and ringed and harbor seals, which he has plastinated over the past thirty years.

To help continue the project, they contacted von Hagen’s company – Gubener Plastinate GmbH, Guben, Germany. von Hagens’ most notable work can be seen in the BODY WORLDS exhibition at museums around the world.

The biggest discovery during the project has been the size of the blue whale heart. It has always been believed that the approximate size of a blue whale heart, was that of a car. However, when they removed the heart, they found it to be much smaller than common literature suggests. The heart measured five feet wide and five and a half feet tall, and its collapsed state fit into a household chest deep freezer.

Though not as large as what was expected, it is still the largest heart Dr. Nader and Dr. Henry have ever worked on. In addition to preserving the whale heart, Dr. Nader and Dr. Henry are working on a publishing an article on the project with Dr. Ismael Concha, an assistant professor of veterinary medicine at LMU-CVM. Dr. Concha will be illustrating the whale heart in the publication.

Once the plastination process is complete, the blue whale heart with the skeleton of the animal is scheduled to be on display at the ROM in Summer 2017.

Lincoln Memorial University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is located on the LMU main campus in Harrogate, Tennessee, with additional academic facilities in nearby Lee County, Virginia. LMU-CVM is an integral part of the University’s Division of Health Sciences and provides real-world, community-based education in a collaborative learning environment. For more information about LMU-CVM, call 1-800-325-0900, ext. 7150 or visit us online at vetmed.lmunet.edu.

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About the ROM
The Royal Ontario Museum is an agency of the Government of Ontario. Opened in 1914, Canada’s largest museum of natural history and world cultures has six million objects in its collections and galleries showcasing art, archaeology and natural science. The ROM is the largest field research institution in the country, and a world leader in research areas from biodiversity, palaeontology, and earth sciences to archaeology, ethnology and visual culture – originating new information towards a global understanding of historical and modern change in culture and environment. For 24-hour information in English and French, please call 416.586.8000 or visit the ROM’s web site at www.rom.on.ca. Tickets are available online at www.rom.on.ca

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