LMU-CVM’S FAULKNER PUBLISHES FEATURE ARTICLE IN JOURNAL

FaulknerJuly 2, 2014 – Dr. Charles Faulkner, assistant professor of veterinary medicine at Lincoln Memorial University-College of Veterinary Medicine (LMU-CVM) is the author of the feature article in the current issue of “The Journal of Parasitology,” Vol. 100, No. 3, 2014.

The article, entitled “A Retrospective Examination of Paleoparasitology and Its Establishment in the Journal of Parasitology,” reviews the history of research in study of parasites preserved in archaeological and paleontological specimens. Until 2009, paleoparasitology had never received recognition for being its own discipline among the sciences, and had always been considered “adjunct” to the study of prehistoric human populations. This all changed when “The Journal of Parasitology” designated a portion of the journal to the publication of research in paleoparasitology and formally recognized it as a disciplinary interest on the cover of the 2009 volume.

For seven decades, scientists have been exploring the origins of parasites and used eggs found in the tissue of Egyptian mummies to support their earliest research. Faulkner’s article traces the evolution of paleoparasitology from how it began with a few scientists and only 665 publications over 65 years, to a global-interest phenomenon with more than 574 written pieces science 2000.

Faulkner joined the LMU-CVM faculty in 2011 as a member of the pre-accreditation team and will teach in the professional curriculum. Prior to his appointment at LMU-CVM he was a faculty member and Director of the Clinical Parasitology Diagnostic Service at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine. In addition to his work in paleoparasitology, Faulkner has conducted research on the parasites in Malagasy lemurs, South African meerkats and parasites of song birds in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

LMU-CVM will be an integral part of the LMU Division of Health Sciences, which includes LMU-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine, the Physician Assistant Program, the Caylor School of Nursing and the School of Allied Health Sciences, which includes a Veterinary Medical Technology Program. As such, in addition to its veterinary faculty and facilities the College will share resources available to the other disciplines within the Division. The college is slated to open in August 2014.

Lincoln Memorial University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is located on the LMU main campus in Harrogate, Tenn., with additional academic facilities in nearby Lee County, Va. LMU-CVM is an integral part of the University’s Division of Health Sciences and provides real-world, community-based education in a collaborative learning environment. For more information about LMU-CVM, call 1-800-325-0900, ext. 7150 or visit us online at vetmed.LMUnet.edu.

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LMU VETERINARY MEDICAL SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP ESTABLISHED

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March 13, 2014 – Dr. Tod Schadler, associate dean for student services and admissions

at Lincoln Memorial University’s College of Veterinary Medicine (LMU-CVM), has established a scholarship to benefit veterinary medical students at LMU.
The Schadler Family Diversity Scholarship will be awarded to a first-year underrepresented minority student at LMU-CVM who exhibits good academic skills (an undergraduate GPA of 3.25 or higher is preferred), has leadership skills as evidenced by leadership positions at work, organizations and/or clubs, and has engaged in community service. Applicants must also submit a short paper detailing how they feel they can be a mentor to future pre-veterinary students. Applications must be submitted by September 15, 2014.

“Diversity, leadership and community service are three important qualities in veterinary medicine,” said Schadler. “This wonderful profession has played a major role in the lives of my parents and my family. I hope this scholarship can be an incentive for the future veterinary leaders that will graduate from LMU-CVM.”

“It is exciting to see the commitment of our faculty members through the establishment of scholarships,” said Cynthia Whitt-Wall, LMU vice president for University Advancement. “Scholarships are vitally important to our students. Although the veterinary future will soon be in their hands, their preparation for the future is now in

ours. What they are taught, how they are taught, and the values we encourage are of infinite importance.”

Lincoln Memorial University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is located on the LMU main campus in Harrogate, Tenn., with additional academic facilities in nearby Lee County, Va. LMU-CVM is an integral part of the University’s Division of Health Sciences and provides real-world, community-based education in a collaborative learning environment. For more information about LMU-CVM, call 1-800-325-0900, ext. 7150 or visit us online at www.lmunet.edu/cvm.

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Caption: Pictured L-R: Cynthia Whitt-Wall, LMU vice president for University Advancement and Dr. Tod Schadler, associate dean for student services and admissions at Lincoln Memorial University’s College of Veterinary Medicine

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HOFFSIS APPOINTED DEAN OF LMU’S COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE

Dr-Glen-HoffsisFebruary 4, 2014 – Lincoln Memorial University (LMU) President B. James Dawson has announced the appointment of Dr. Glen F. Hoffsis as dean of LMU’s College of Veterinary Medicine (LMU-CVM) and associate Vice President of Health Sciences. The appointment is effective July 1, 2014.

Hoffsis has been serving as a consultant to LMU-CVM for the past several months. Hoffsis retired as dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Florida in July 2013 after serving in that capacity for seven years. He also has served as the dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at The Ohio State University for 11 years and held a leadership position with P&G Pet Health and Nutrition. Early in his career Hoffsis was a faculty member at The Ohio State University and served in several leadership roles, including director of the teaching hospital. He has held many professional positions, including president of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners, chair of the FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee and president of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges. Hoffsis currently serves on the board of directors of Banfield Pet Hospitals of Portland, Ore., and Live Oak Bank of Wilmington, N.C. He is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

“Dean Hoffsis is a very experienced academic leader who is well-known in the profession,” said Dawson. “He has the knowledge and skills needed to continue the establishment of our College of Veterinary Medicine and make the vision of providing veterinary medical education in the Cumberland Gap region a reality. LMU is indeed fortunate to gain the services of a leader with Dean Hoffsis’ background. We appreciate the leadership and hard work from current Dean Randy Evans, and look forward to his continuing services as associate dean and member of LMU-CVM’s senior leadership team.”

LMU-CVM will be an integral part of the LMU Division of Health Sciences, which includes LMU-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine, the Physician Assistant Program, the Caylor School of Nursing and the School of Allied Health Sciences, which includes a Veterinary Medical Technology Program. As such, in addition to its veterinary faculty and facilities the College will share resources available to the other disciplines within the Division. The college is slated to open in August 2014.

“I’m excited to have the opportunity to create an innovative program from square one,” Hoffsis said. “This is a rare opportunity to institute new concepts in veterinary education.”

Lincoln Memorial University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is located on the LMU main campus in Harrogate, Tenn., with additional academic facilities in nearby Lee County, Va. LMU-CVM is an integral part of the University’s Division of Health Sciences and provides real-world, community-based education in a collaborative learning environment. For more information about LMU-CVM, call 1-800-325-0900, ext. 7150 or visit us online at vetmed.LMUnet.edu.

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LMU VETERINARY MEDICAL SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP ESTABLISHED

LMU Veterinary Medical School Scholarship EstablishedJanuary 13, 2014 – Dr. Jason W. Johnson, medical director of the Large Animal Teaching and Research Center at Lincoln Memorial University’s College of Veterinary Medicine (LMU-CVM), along with his wife Dr. Jennifer T. Johnson, have established a scholarship to benefit veterinary medical students at LMU.

The Drs. Jason W. and Jennifer T. Johnson Rural Appalachian Region Veterinary Scholarship will be offered to a freshman student that originates from the Appalachian region pursuing a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree, who, upon graduation, intends to practice in Appalachia. Candidates will have exhibited a strong work ethic, community service and maintained an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.8. Priority will be given to students who exhibit financial need. Both Dr. Johnsons grew up in rural areas and hope, through this scholarship, to make veterinary medical education available to those students from rural areas who might not otherwise have the opportunity.
“We are delighted with the establishment of this LMU-CVM scholarship and the commitment of our faculty,” stated Cynthia Whitt-Wall, LMU vice president for University Advancement. “It is to our students to whom we have the most urgent responsibility. Although the veterinary future will soon be in their hands, their preparation for the future is now in ours. What they are taught, and how they are taught, is of infinite importance. Scholarships are vitally important and we encourage others to take the lead of our faculty.”

Lincoln Memorial University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is located on the LMU main campus in Harrogate, Tenn., with additional academic facilities in nearby Lee County, Va. LMU-CVM is an integral part of the University’s Division of Health Sciences and provides real-world, community-based education in a collaborative learning environment. For more information about LMU-CVM, call 1-800-325-0900, ext. 7150 or visit us online at www.lmunet.edu/cvm.

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Caption: Pictured L-R: Cynthia Whitt-Wall, LMU vice president for University Advancement, Dr. Jennifer T. Johnson, Elijah Johnson, Dr. Jason W. Johnson, medical director of the LMU-CVM Large Animal Teaching and Research Center and Frank Woodward, LMU assistant vice president for University Advancement.

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LMU’S COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE RECEIVES $537,000 GRANT

LMU’S COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINELincoln Memorial University’s emerging College of Veterinary Medicine (LMU-CVM) has received a grant in excess of $500,000 from the Virginia Tobacco Indemnification and Community Revitalization Commission to help fund construction of the Large Animal Teaching and Research Center (LATRC) of the LMU College of Veterinary Medicine in Lee County, Va.

The $537,000 grant benefits LMU-CVM, which will be the 30th veterinary school in the United States and among the first veterinary colleges dedicated to serving Appalachia, and more specifically Virginia. LMU-CVM is now recruiting students for enrollment in the inaugural class, slated to begin in Fall 2014.

The LATRC will provide education for veterinary students, diagnostic veterinary animal services, research in veterinary medicine and outreach to Appalachia. Every student conferred the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from LMU-CVM will be required to complete close to three years of curricular coursework at the LATRC.

“This grant is a wonderful tool as we continue to fulfill our mission of providing educational opportunities to the underserved of Appalachia and beyond,” said LMU President B. James Dawson. “The LATRC is an essential resource for our emerging College of Veterinary Medicine and the students it will serve. Without the support and contributions of our many partners, this venture would not be possible.”

Once fully completed, the LATRC will include facilities designated for education, research and service in veterinary medicine. The Virginia Tobacco Commission grant will aid in construction of the core 13,080-square-foot Main Building, which will house student spaces such as restrooms and showers, a large classroom and a student break room. The facility will also include faculty and staff offices, a conference room, a pharmacy and a clinical laboratory. The Bovine Clinical Skills wing will house up to 90 cows at one time and serve as a space where faculty will teach students about the anatomy and physiology of the cow, how to perform thorough physical exams, and clinical skill techniques in ultrasound, artificial insemination, pregnancy diagnosis, anesthesia, restraint, medicine and surgery. This core facility is part of a comprehensive plan which, once to full capacity, will include construction of a Large Animal Clinical Skills Center, an Equine Teaching Center that will require a herd of thirty horses, an Isolation Facility and an Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory. The grant was submitted by Dr. Jason W. Johnson, assistant professor of veterinary medicine and medical director of the LATRC.

“Not only will the LATRC provide a place for our veterinary medicine students to learn large animal medicine and surgery, it will also benefit animal agricultural capacity in Virginia,” said Johnson. “The facility will provide a platform to offer trainings and certifications to key area animal stakeholders as well as ambulatory outreach services and accessible experts.”

Lincoln Memorial University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is located on the LMU main campus in Harrogate, Tenn., with additional academic facilities in nearby Lee County, Va. LMU-CVM is an integral part of the University’s Division of Health Sciences and provides real-world, community-based education in a collaborative learning environment. For more information about LMU-CVM, call 1-800-325-0900, ext. 7150.

Caption: An artist’s rendering of the completed Main Building of the LMU Large Animal Teaching and Research Center in Ewing, Va., which is currently under construction.

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U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORTS NAMES LMU 2014 UP-AND-COMER

Best CollegesHarrogate, Tennessee — The national publication U.S. News and World Report released its annual college rankings on Tuesday, and Lincoln Memorial University (LMU) was placed on the 2014 Up-and-Comers list.

“This recognition is certainly fitting for LMU. We are an institution on the rise and have spent the last decade growing rapidly. It is nice to see our progress recognized on a national scale,” LMU President B. James Dawson said. “It is especially gratifying knowing that this recognition was a result of a survey of our peers.”

The web exclusive category was compiled as a result of college administrators surveyed in the spring of 2013 for the 2014 U.S. News Best Colleges rankings being asked to nominate institutions that they thought had recently made the most promising and innovative changes in areas of academics, faculty, student life, campus or facilities. The colleges and universities that appear on the list were cited most often by college presidents, provosts and admissions deans. LMU earned the same designation a year ago.

LMU was selected as the No. 7 Up-and-Comer Regional University in the South. Joining LMU on the list are Elon University (N.C.), Belmont University (Tenn.), Christopher Newport University (Va.), Kennesaw State University (Ga.), Appalachian State University (N.C.), College of Charleston (S.C.), Union University (Tenn.), Western Kentucky University and Winthrop University (S.C.). The complete Up-and-Comers listing can be found online at www.usnews.com/colleges.

LMU also made significant gains in its overall ranking as it moved up 14 spots in the Regional University South to No. 66. Last year’s No. 80 ranking marked the first time the University was listed among the Tier 1 institutions in the South.

The University has expanded from its liberal arts core and now offers advanced and professional degrees in osteopathic medicine, law, business, nursing and education. LMU students run the gamut, from first-generation college students to working professionals seeking to complete their degree to professional students pursuing their doctorates. The University also operates 11 extended learning sites, offering programs throughout the region. Earlier this summer, LMU announced that it had received a Letter of Reasonable Assurance from the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Council on Education (COE), the initial step in accreditation for the emerging LMU-College of Veterinary Medicine. LMU-CVM is now recruiting students for the inaugural class, which will begin its veterinary medical education in Fall 2014.

Lincoln Memorial University is a values-based learning community dedicated to providing educational experiences in the liberal arts and professional studies. The main campus is located in Harrogate, Tennessee. For more information about the undergraduate and graduate programs available at LMU, contact the Office of Admissions at 423-869-6280 or e-mail at admissions@lmunet.edu.

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LMU APPROVED FOR NEW VETERINARY MEDICAL SCHOOL

Lincoln Memorial University’s emerging College of Veterinary Medicine (LMU-CVM) has cleared the first step in the accreditation process with a Letter of Reasonable Assurance from the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Council on Education (COE). LMU-CVM is now recruiting students for the inaugural class, which will begin its veterinary medical education in Fall 2014.

“The approval from the COE to open a new school of veterinary medicine in Harrogate, Tenn., will propel this University to even greater heights and establish LMU as a leader in professional studies for the region,” said LMU Board of Trustees Chairman Autry O.V. “Pete” DeBusk.

LMU announced in 2011 that it was pursuing a College of Veterinary Medicine. In that year, the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium (NAVMEC), which consisted of over 400 stakeholders in veterinary education representing academia, accreditation and testing/licensure, released a report that provided a roadmap for veterinary education. The Five Strategic Goals in this NAVMEC report served as the guiding light for creation of the LMU-CVM’s hybrid distributive model for delivery of veterinary education.

The emerging LMU-CVM will be an integral part of the LMU Division of Health Sciences, which includes LMU-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine, the Physician Assistant Program, the Caylor School of Nursing and the School of Allied Health Sciences, which includes a Veterinary Medical Technology Program. As such, in addition to its veterinary faculty and facilities the emerging College will share resources available to the other disciplines within the Division.

“We have assembled an exemplary team of professionals to develop this program.” LMU President B. James Dawson said. “The CVM will build upon LMU’s well-established allied health science programs in providing much-needed veterinary services to this region. LMU-CVM will be an exciting veterinary medical education program that graduates confident, career-ready veterinarians.”

Lincoln Memorial University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is located on the LMU main campus in Harrogate, Tenn., with additional academic facilities in nearby Lee County, Va. LMU-CVM is an integral part of the University’s Division of Health Sciences and provides real-world, community-based education in a collaborative learning environment. For more information about LMU-CVM, call 1-800-325-0900, ext. 7150.

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FAULKNER RECEIVES MERITORIUS SERVICE AWARD

FAULKNER RECEIVES MERITORIUS SERVICE AWARDDr. Charles Faulkner, assistant professor of veterinary science and director of admissions for the emerging College of Veterinary and Comparative Medicine, received the Meritorious Service Award from the Southeastern Society of Parasitologists at the group’s annual meeting in Bowling Green, Ky., in April.

The Meritorious Service Award recognizes an individual for outstanding teaching, research and/ or community service enhancing the science of parasitology, which is the study of parasites and their hosts and the relationship between them. The award has only been presented eight times since the founding of the Society in 1969. Faulkner previously received the Society’s Byrd Award for best student presentation in 1987 as a student and served the society as vice president in 2000 and president in 2004.

Faulkner earned his bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and taught at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine from 1998 until joining the LMU faculty in 2011. His research interests include diagnostic parasitology; epidemiology and chemotherapy of parasitism; household diagnosis, management and prevention of parasitic infections; zoonotic parasitic diseases, ecology and evolutionary biology of parasitic infection; parasitic infections of Malagasy lemurids, parasitic infections of passerine birds in Great Smoky Mountains National Park; and paleoparasitology of humans and animals.

Lincoln Memorial University is a values-based learning community dedicated to providing educational experiences in the liberal arts and professional studies. The main campus is located in Harrogate, Tennessee. For more information about the undergraduate and graduate programs available at LMU, contact the Office of Admissions at 423-869-6280 or e-mail at admissions@lmunet.edu.

Caption: Dr. Charles Faulkner (L) receives the Southeastern Society of Parasitologists’ Meritorious Service Award from Dr. Chris Hall (R), presiding president of the organization’s annual meeting.

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LMU’S JOHNSON RECEIVES NATIONAL RECOGNITION

LMU’S JOHNSON RECEIVES NATIONAL RECOGNITIONJason Johnson, assistant professor of veterinary medicine and medical director of the Large Animal Teaching and Research Center for Lincoln Memorial University’s (LMU) proposed College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM), has recently received two national recognitions. Johnson is one of 10 veterinarians nationwide to be selected for the American Veterinary Medical Association’s (AVMA) Future Leaders Program and has been named to Veterinary Practice News’s “25 Vets to Watch in our 25th Year” list.

The year-long program Future Leaders Program, created by the AVMA and supported by Pfizer Animal Health, will help develop leadership skills in the selected group of volunteer leaders for the future of the AVMA and other veterinary groups. This is the second year for the Future Leaders Program. Johnson was chosen from among approximately 60 AVMA member nominees who had graduated from veterinary school within the last 15 years.

“I have always felt it is important to be intimately involved in organized veterinary medicine and I’m proud to participate in the AVMA Future Leaders Program,” said Johnson. “I hope the program will unveil my inadequacies, refine my leadership and communication skills and equip, embolden and envision me to best represent the AVMA in future capacities.

Veterinary Practice News identified 25 up-and-coming veterinarians to watch in honor of the publication’s 25th anniversary. In their profile of Johnson the magazine cited a You Tube video in which Johnson recounted that in pursuit of his work on food animal production and food security, he’s “befriended chiefs with spears, knives, bows and arrows and AR-15s. I’ve been given five goats, and countless numbers of chickens,” he continued. “I’ve been kicked, bitten, scratched, stomped, tipped, slipped, hit, bonked, thrown, defecated upon, urinated upon, run over, run down, thrown down and smitten by animals across the globe. And I love it. Such is our profession.”

Johnson is a 2003 graduate of the Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine and a diplomate in the American College of Theriogenologists (the branch of veterinary medicine concerned with reproduction). Johnson completed a three-year residency at Auburn University in food animal theriogenology, earning a master’s degree. Johnson is a native of Luverne, Ala.

Lincoln Memorial University is a values-based learning community dedicated to providing educational experiences in the liberal arts and professional studies. The main campus is located in Harrogate, Tennessee. For more information about the undergraduate and graduate programs available at LMU, contact the Office of Admissions at 423-869-6280 or e-mail at admissions@lmunet.edu.

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ONGOING RESEARCH

In ongoing research, Dr. Jeffrey Phillips has been working to identify new treatments for a devastating form of cancer in horses.   Dr. Phillips leads a collaborative research group that is studying a new treatment for equine melanoma. Melanomas are among the most common tumors noted in horses comprising ~15% of all skin tumors.  These tumors occur in all breeds and colors of horses but are most commonly seen in grey horses, reaching incidence rates as high as 80% in older animals.  Because many horses present for treatment of their tumors with locally advanced, non-resectable tumors, effective non-surgical therapies are clearly needed to improve survival in these patients.  Ideally, these therapies would include drugs that have not only local but also systemic activity to either treat or prevent disease spread.  Therapies that target tumor-specific “factors” have the potential to not only treat but to potentially prevent the development of tyrosinase-expressing tumors.

The goal of this Morris Animal Foundation (D12EQ-037) funded project is to evaluate a new type of vaccine to treat horses with melanoma.  This vaccine has been previously reported to be effective in treating melanoma in dogs.  To accomplish our goal we proposed a study wherein the vaccine was used in gradually escalating doses in horses that had been diagnosed with melanoma.  Horses are then evaluated for effective response to vaccine, immunologic response, and side effects.  Effective response to vaccine would be determined based on changes in the tumor.  Immunologic response would be evaluated using serum antibody titers and measures of cell-mediated response.

To date, we have accrued and treated the first two cohorts of patients for this project.  These horses have been closely monitored for side effects and evidence of beneficial response.  Virtually every horse has demonstrated substantial improvement following treatment.  In some cases, benefit has been seen as early as two weeks after initiation.  We are moving forward with the recruitment of additional cases and expect to be able demonstrate that the vaccine is safe and effective for the treatment of equine melanoma.

Anti-tumor cellular infiltrate in treated horses.

Anti-tumor cellular infiltrate in treated horses. (Image provided by Dr. John Biggerstaff, co-investigator).

A melanoma in a grey horse both before and after therapy with marked improvement noted.

A melanoma in a grey horse both before and after therapy with marked improvement noted.

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